Coors Field Denver has become my new favorite major league baseball ballpark for its central location within walking distance to all of the Colorado capital’s central sights and its value ticket options.

Its brick facade lends a vintage feel to the ballpark allowing it to blend into downtown Denver’s historic warehouses creating a continuity rather than a contrast to the surrounding neighborhood. In fact, ballpark designers were so conscious of the impact on the nearby area that to prevent it from being imposing on nearby neighborhood buildings the field is 21 feet below street level.

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I turned up very early for the 6:40 PM game time to take in the ballpark and watch batting practice from behind home plate.

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In planning my Denver Summer weekend escape months in advance I checked the Colorado Rockies schedule and happily found the team on a four-game home stand against the Pittsburgh Pirates and in researching ticket options eventually settling on a ticket in the 2,300 seat bleacher section located behind the center field backdrop known as the ‘Rockpile’ for USD$11 including $5 processing fee. Spending a warm Summer evening watching the Rockies continue their fight for a playoff spot for less than the price of a movie is huge value and was hugely enjoyed even with a 45-minute rain delay in the seventh inning.

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The ‘Rockpile’ bench seats have no backs on them but as the ballpark wasn’t full there was plenty of space to spread out with popcorn, a hot dog and a beer or two.

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Check out the 360-degree view from the ‘Rockpile’ seats and walk through a video tour Coors Field.

Denver is known as the ‘Mile-High City’ and that elevation is marked by the purple coloured seats in the 20th row of the upper deck.

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Hitters have always loved the friendly confines of Coors Field as the higher elevation means a lower air density enabling the baseball to travel further resulting in more runs and home runs.

The Sandlot Brewery has been a staple of the ballpark since it opened and became the first brewery located within a major league ballpark.

Brewmasters at the Sandlot created a Belgian style witbier that they called Belly Slide Wit which became so popular it was re-branded as Blue Moon Belgian White and has gone on to win awards and become the most popular craft beer in the U.S. although the use of the term ‘craft beer’ has been disputed by some.

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photo by author

The ‘Rooftop’ is a standing-room only section in upper right field that features craft beer, local food, spaces to socialize and take in incredible views of the game, city skyline and Rocky Mountains from a beer rail.  This casual corner of Coors Field was added for the 2014 baseball season and has proved hugely popular at recreating a neighborhood bar like many found nearby in Denver’s LoDo (Lower Downtown) district. The Rooftop is open to all ticket holders throughout the game.

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In the mid-90’s when sponsored stadium names was in its infancy, Coors scored a masterstroke by contributing $30 million to build the baseball-only stadium, $15 million of which was for the rights to put the brewery giant’s name on the ballpark “in perpetuity”. Consider that naming rights to Toronto’s Air Canada Centre was bought earlier this year by Scotiabank for $800 million, the Coors deal is the best in the pro sports business.

I’ve visited a few major league ballparks in recent years including most recently Citi Field in the New York borough of Queens which is home to the Mets but a 45-minute journey with transfer  from lower Manhattan so it was refreshing to be able to walk to Coors Field from the downtown core.

I highly recommend a visit to this ballpark as it offers value seats, a super central location, a quality Rockies team in the hunt for a post-season berth and plenty of places to explore before and during the three-hour average game.


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